Causes of Hearing Loss

How Hearing Loss Occurs There are three types of hearing loss, sensorineural, conductive and mixed hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing loss...

How Hearing Loss Occurs

There are three types of hearing loss, sensorineural, conductive and mixed hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing loss occurs when the inner ear or hearing nerves in the brain are damaged. Conductive hearing loss is when the ear canal, ear drum or middle ear is not transmitted sound effectively, usually because of a blockage. Mixed hearing loss occurs when there is a combination of issues with the inner and middle ears and both sensorineural and conductive hearing loss occur.

Factors to Hearing  Loss

Aging

The gradual loss of hearing that occurs over time. Aging is a sensorineural type of hearing loss where the inner ear changes when you age. Since it occurs over time, it is important to get annual hearing tests so your hearing loss can be actively monitored.

Noise-induced

Noise-induced hearing loss is caused by the prolonged exposure to loud noise or from the impact of a close loud noise. Prolonged exposure to environments with loud noises will negatively impact your hearing in the long run. It is essential to protect your ears when in environments with loud noises for an extended period of time.

  • Occupational noises: Jobs where there is loud noise regularly at your working environment
  • Recreational noises: Exposure to explosive noises can cause immediate, permanent hearing loss. Other activities with dangerously high noise levels can cause a gradual hearing loss over time

Buildup of Earwax

A buildup of earwax can block the ear canal and therefore hinder your hearing.

Illnesses

There are numerous illnesses and disorders that can contribute to hearing loss such as diabetes and meningitis. Some medications also can have temporary or permanent impacts to your hearing if they are taken in high doses.

Other

Other conductive hearing loss factors include foreign objects blocking the ear canal, a build up of fluids in the middle ear or ear canal, ear infections, scarring/rupture of the ear drum and any other abnormal growths or tumours that block the conduction of soundwaves.

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